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Tamilnadu Samacheer Kalvi 11th Maths Solutions Chapter 1 Sets Ex 1.1

11th Maths Exercise 1.1 Answers Question 1.
Write the following in roster form.
(i) {x ∈ N : x2 < 121 and x is a prime}.
(ii) the set of all positive roots of the equation (x – 1)(x + 1)(x2 – 1) = 0.
(iii) {x ∈ N : 4x + 9 < 52}.
(iv) {x : \(\frac{x-4}{x+2}\) = 3, x ∈ R – {-2}}
Solution:
(i) A = {2, 3, 5, 7}
(ii) B = {1}
(iii) 4x + 9 < 52
4x + 9 – 9 < 52 – 9
4x < 43
x < \(\frac{43}{4}\) (i.e.) x < 10.75 4
But x ∈ N
∴ A = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}
11th Maths Exercise 1.1 Answers Samacheer Kalvi Chapter 1 Sets
(i.e.) x – 4 = 3(x + 2)
x – 4 = 3x + 6
– 4 – 6 = 3x – x
2x = -10 ⇒ x = -5
A = {-5}

11th Std Maths Exercise 1.1 Answers Question 2.
Write the set {-1,1} in set builder form.
Solution:
A = {x: x2 = 1}

11th Maths Book Exercise 1.1 Answers Question 3.
State whether the following sets are finite or infinite.
(i) {x ∈ N : x is an even prime number}
(ii) {x ∈ N : x is an odd prime number}
(iii) {x ∈ Z : x is even and less than 10}
(iv) {x ∈ R : x is a rational number}
(v) {x ∈ N : x is a rational number}
Solution:
(i) Finite set
(ii) Infinite set
(iii) Infinite
(iv) and
(v) infinite

Exercise 1.1 Class 11 Maths State Board Question 4.
By taking suitable sets A, B, C, verify the following results:
(i) A × (B ∩ C) = (A × B) ∩ (A × C).
(if) A × (B ∪ C) = (A × B) ∪ (A × C).
(iii) (A × B) ∩ (B × A) = (A ∩ B) × (B ∩ A).
(iv) C – (B – A) = (C ∩ A) ∪ (C ∩ B).
(v) (B – A) ∩ C = (B ∩ C) – A = B ∩ (C – A).
Solution:
To prove the following results let us take U = {1, 2, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10}
A = {1, 2, 5, 7}
B = {2, 7, 8, 9}
C = {1, 5, 8, 7}
(i) To prove: A × (B ∩ C) = (A × B) ∩ (A × C)
B ∩ C = {8}; A = {1, 2, 5, 7}
So A × (B ∩ C) = {1, 2, 5, 7} × {8}
= {(1, 8), (2. 8), (5, 8), (7, 8)}
Now A x B = {(1, 2), (1, 7), (1, 8), (1, 9), (2, 2), (2, 7), (2, 8), (2, 9), (5, 2), (5, 7), (5, 8), (5, 9), (7, 2), (7, 7), (7, 8), (7, 9)} …. ( 1)
A × C = {(1, 1), (1, 5),(1, 8), (1, 10), (2, 1), (2, 5), (2, 8), (2, 10), (5, 1), (5, 5), (5, 8), (5, 10), (7, 1), (7, 5), (7, 8), (7, 10)}
(A × B) ∩ (A × C) = {(1, 8), (2, 8), (5, 8), (7, 8)} ……… (2)
(1) = (2)
⇒ A × (B ∩ C) = (A × B) ∩ (A × C)

(ii) To prove A × (B ∪ C) = (A × B) (A × C)
B = {2, 7, 8, 9}, C = {1, 5, 8, 10)
B ∪ C = {1, 2, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10}
A = {1, 2, 5, 7}
A × (B ∪ C) = {(1, 1), (1, 2), (1, 5), (1, 7), (1, 8), (1, 9), (1, 10), (2, 1), (2, 2), (2, 5), (2, 7), (2, 8), (2, 9), (2, 10), (5, 1), (5, 2), (5, 5), (5, 7), (5, 8), (5, 9), (5, 10), (7, 1), (7, 2), (7, 5), (7, 7), (7, 8), (7, 9), (7, 10)) …. (1)
A × B = {(1, 2), (1, 7), (1, 8), (1, 9), (2, 2), (2, 7), (2, 8), (2, 9), (5, 2), (5, 7), (5, 8), (5, 9),
(7, 2), (7, 7), (7, 8), (7, 9)}
A × C = {(1, 1), (1, 5), (1, 8), (1, 10), (2, 1), (2, 5), (2, 8), (2, 10), (5, 1), (5, 5), (5, 8), (5, 10), (7, 1), (7, 5), (7, 8), (7, 10)}
(A × B) ∪ (A × C) = (1, 1), (1, 2), (1, 5), (1, 7), (1, 8), (1,9), (1, 10), (2, 1), (2, 2), (2, 5), (2, 7), (2, 8), (2, 9), (2, 10), (5, 1), (5, 2), (5, 5), (5, 7), (5, 8), (5, 9), (5, 10), (7, 1), (7, 2), (7, 5), (7, 7), (7, 8), (7, 9), (7, 10)} …… (2)
(1) = (2) ⇒ A × (B ∪ C) = (A × B) ∪ (A × C)

(iii) A × B = {(1, 2), (1, 7), (1, 8), (1, 9) (2, 2), (2, 7), (2, 8), (2, 9) (5, 2), (5, 7), (5, 8), (5, 9) (7, 2), (7, 7), (7, 8), (7, 9)}
B × A = {(2, 1), (2, 2), (2, 5), (2, 7) (7, 1), (7, 2), (7, 5), (7, 7) (8, 1), (8, 2), (8, 5), (8, 7) (9,1), (9, 2), (9, 5), (9, 7)}
L.H.S. (A × B) ∩ (B × A) = {(2, 2), (2, 7), (7, 2), (7, 7)} …. (1)
R.H.S. A ∩ B = {2, 7}
B ∩ A = {2, 7}
(A ∩ B) × (B ∩ A) = {2, 7} × {2, 7}
= {(2, 2), (2, 7), (7, 2), (7, 7)} ……… (2)
(1) = (2) ⇒ LHS = RHS

(iv) To prove C – (B – A) = (C ∩ A) ∪ (C ∩ B)
B – A = {8, 9}
C = {1, 5, 8, 10}
∴ LHS = C – (B – A) = {1, 5, 10} …… (1)
C ∩ A = {1}
U = {1, 2, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10}
B = {2, 7, 8, 9} ∴ B’ = {1, 5, 10}
C ∩ B = {1, 5, 10}
R.H.S. (C ∩ A) ∪ (C ∩ B) = {1} ∪ {1, 5, 10}
= {1, 5, 10} ……. (2)
(1) = (2) ⇒ LHS = RHS

(v) To prove (B – A) ∩ C = (B ∩ C) – A = B ∩ (C – A)
A= {1, 2, 5, 7}, B = {2, 7, 8, 9}, C = {1, 5, 8, 10}
Now B – A = {8, 9}
(B – A) ∩ C = {8} ……. (1)
B ∩ C = {8}
A = {1, 2, 5, 7}
So (B ∩ C) – A = {8} …… (2)
C – A = {8, 10}
B = {2, 7, 8, 9}
B ∩ (C – A) = {8} …. (3)
(1) = (2) = (3)

(vi) To prove (B – A) ∪ C ={1, 5, 8, 9, 10}
B – A = {8, 9},
C = {1, 5, 8, 10}
(B – A) ∪ C = {1, 5, 8, 9, 10} ……. (1)
B ∪ C = {1, 2, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10}
A – C = {2, 7}
(B ∪ C) – (A – C) = {1, 5, 8, 9, 10} ……… (2)
(1) = (2)
⇒ (B – A) ∪ C = (B ∪ C) – (A – C)

11th Maths Exercise 1.1 Question 5.
Justify the trueness of the statement.
“An element of a set can never be a subset of itself.”
Solution:
A set itself can be a subset of itself (i.e.) A ⊆ A. But it cannot be a proper subset.

11th Maths Chapter 1 Exercise 1.1 Question 6.
If n(P(A)) = 1024, n(A ∪ B) = 15 and n(P(B)) = 32, then find n(A ∩ B).
Solution:
n(P( A)) = 1024 = 210 ⇒ n( A) = 10
n(A ∪ B) = 15
n(P(B)) = 32 = 25 ⇒ n(B) = 5
We know n(A ∪ B) = n{A) + n(B) – n(A ∩ B)
(i.e.) 15 = 10 + 5 – n(A ∩ B)
⇒ n(A ∩ B) = 15 – 15 = 0

11 Maths Exercise 1.1 Question 7.
If n(A ∩ B) = 3 and n(A ∪ B) = 10, then find n(P(A(A ∆ B)).
Solution:
n(A ∪ B) = 10; n(A ∩ B) = 3
n(A ∆ B) = 10 – 3 = 7
and n(P(A ∆ B)) = 27 = 128

11th Maths 1.1 Exercise Question 8.
For a set A, A × A contains 16 elements and two of its elements are (1, 3) and (0, 2). Find the elements of A.
Solution:
A × A = 16 elements = 4 × 4
⇒ A has 4 elements
∴ A = {0, 1, 2, 3}

11th Maths Exercise 1.1 Answers In Tamil Question 9.
Let A and B be two sets such that n(A) = 3 and n(B) = 2. If (x, 1), (y, 2), (z, 1) are in A × B, find A and B, where x, y, z are distinct elements.
Solution:
n(A) = 3 ⇒ set A contains 3 elements
n(B) = 2 ⇒ set B contains 2 elements –
we are given (x, 1), (y, 2), (z, 1) are elements in A × B ⇒ A = {x, y, z} and B = {1, 2}

11th Maths Exercise 1.1 Answers State Board Question 10.
If A × A has 16 elements, S = {(a, b) ∈ A × A : a < b} ; (-1, 2) and (0, 1) are two elements of S, then find the remaining elements of S.
Solution:
n(A × A) = 16 ⇒ n( A) = 4
S ={(-1, 0), (-1, 1), (0, 2), (1, 2)}

Samacheer Kalvi 11th Maths Solutions Chapter 1 Sets Ex 1.1 Additional Questions

Samacheer Kalvi 11th Maths Example Sums Question 1.
Write the following sets in roster form
(a) {x ∈ N; x3 < 1000}
(b) {The set of positive roots of the equation (x2 – 4) (x3 – 27) = 0}
Solution:
(a) A = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9}
(b) B = {2, 3}

11th Maths Exercise 1.1 4th Sum Question 2.
By taking suitable sets A, B, C verify the following results
(i) A × (B ∪ C) = (A × B) ∪ (A × C)
(ii) (B – A) ∪ C = (B ∪ C) – (A – C)
Solution:
Prove by yourself

11th Maths 1st Chapter Exercise 1.1 Question 3.
Given n(A) = 7; n(B) = 8 and n(A ∪ B) = 10 find n[P(A ∩ B)].
Solution:
n(A ∪ B) = n(A) + n(B) – n(A ∩ B)
(i.e.,) 10 = 7 + 8 – n(A ∩ B)
⇒ n(A ∩ B) = 7 + 8 – 10 = 5
So n[P(A ∩ B)] = 25 = 32

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